Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition completes 900+ mile journey

Mallory Lykes Dimmitt   3/17/2015

Week 9-10 Florida Wildlife Corridor

From Expedition Team Member, Joe Guthrie, “One of the most interesting sunsets, Hagen’s Cove, Taylor County, Florida.”

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition has been on the trail for 900+ miles and nearly 70 days. On March 19th, they will complete their epic journey which led the team through some of Florida’s most beautiful ecosystems including the Rainbow River Springs made famous by the recent congregation of hundreds of manatees.

Although the Glades to Gulf Expedition is almost complete, the work of Florida Wildlife Corridor is far from over. The passage of Amendment 1 and the awareness of the need for wildlife corridors is just the beginning.

In 2014, more than 93 million people traveled to see the natural beauty we have here in Florida. We are more than just beaches. Florida is home to coral reefs, oyster beds. dunes, marshes, swamps, hardwood hammocks, mangroves, pinelands and scrubs. With Florida becoming one of the most populated states in the country, the journey has not ended in connecting, protecting and restoring corridors of conserved lands and waters that are essential for the survival of Florida’s diverse wildlife.

Click here to read the complete Florida Trend article.

Manatees Getting Too Much Love

Snorkelers interact with a Florida manatee at the Three Sisters Springs inside the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge in Crystal River, Fla. (Scott Audette/Reuters)

March 17

Chubby Florida manatees are adorable.

Lumbering in the cozy waters of their habitat, they look like big, soft, squishy gray pillows. Anyone who wants to jump in and give them a big squeeze is in luck at the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge on the central gulf coast of Florida. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials who manage the refuge say go ahead, they don’t bite.

But whether that’s good for the beloved “sea cow” is a question that could one day be resolved by a threatened lawsuit. A group called Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility is deeply upset that the refuge allows swimming with an endangered marine mammal in the warm springs that serve as their winter sanctuary.

[They thrived for millions of years. Now, there are only 1,100 Hawaiian monk seals left. ]

People are loving the manatees to death, the group says, and Fish and Wildlife has let the smothering affection develop into a lucrative tourism industry at Three Sisters Springs in Citrus County. PEER filed a notice of intent to sue Fish and Wildlife if they don’t tell tourists to back off. Fish and Wildlife has until May to respond.

“Swim with programs significantly impair these endangered animals’ essential behavioral patterns, including breeding, feeding, and sheltering,” said the group’s counsel, Laura Dumais. “Some people have a hard time understanding this connection, because they don’t see manatees keeling over before their eyes; they might think that the manatees don’t seem to mind.”

A manatee calf nurses from its mother inside of the Three Sisters Springs. On winter days, Florida manatees flock by the hundreds to the balmy waters of Three Sisters Springs, drawing crowds of snorkelers and kayakers to the U.S. sanctuary, where people may swim with the endangered species. (Scott Audette/Reuters)

The manatees certainly don’t seem to mind, the refuge’s manager said. Florida’s manatee population topped a record 6,000 this week in the state’s latest survey, nearly 1,000 more than the previous high. The numbers are so high that some are calling on the service to remove the manatee’s protection under the Endangered Species Act, where they’ve been listed since it began in 1973. A review that might downgrade them from endangered to threatened is in the draft stage.

“The manatee is actually a success story. Their numbers are going up, the population is going up,” said Andrew Gude, manager of the refuge. “Tourism has also gone through the roof. You can rent a car and for $40 you can swim with a mammal that will never rip you apart. The reason the service has been so supportive is that when people see the manatees and get in the water with them, in a lot of ways it changes their lives and they’re a lot more conservation-minded.”

[The small vaquita porpoise is on the verge of extinction]

This time of year, when cold-sensitive manatees migrate to the warm springs because water temperatures below 68 degrees could kill them, hundreds of thousands of tourists rush to where they congregate to gawk at and touch them. They snorkel, kayak, raft, scuba, boat and swim free style.

Scores of West Indian manatees huddle near a freshwater spring at Three Sisters Springs. The warm-blooded aquatic creatures which live in the shallow confines of the river seek the warmth of the 72-degree spring water when temperatures plummet. (Matthew Beck/Citrus County Chronicle via AP)

With 327,000 visitors last year, the Crystal River refuge was the 5th most visited in the nation, with sweet, lovable manatees as the main attraction. As hundreds of thousands of humans thrash in the water for a moment of intimacy and, of course, a photo op, the narrow swimming channels the manatees use to come and go are blocked, and studies show that some stay away, not wanting to be bothered by the commotion, PEER said. A concern is that manatees will risk deadly cold gulf waters.

“It is the behavior that doesn’t happen that’s problematic – the manatees that see swimmers crowding the run and don’t enter the spring,” Dumais said.
In a recently adopted assessment to manage manatees, Crystal River didn’t decide to ban all human contact with manatees as PEER wants, but the refuge does take additional steps to protect them. It will close the sanctuary to tourism during extreme cold, when manatees need it most. And it expand an area where humans are prohibited, allowing more manatees to avoid being touched.

Manatee numbers are rebounding now, she said, but history shows that the population of this sensitive creature could take another dive at any time. Nearly 800 were killed in 2010, and an extended cold snap was blamed for 300 of those deaths. Three years later, there were a record 800 deaths. Fish and Wildlife estimates that 99 manatee deaths per year are related to humans. The population’s low in Florida was about 1,400.

[Navy war games face suit over impact on whales, dolphins]

Manatees have been in the state for 45 million years, according to fossil records. They are an offshoot of the West Indian manatee that roams the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean to north Brazil, and the Gulf of Mexico from southern Mexico to Colombia. In those areas, they are scattered in much smaller numbers.

They are totally chill. Not known to harm anything, they spend their days diving to dine on sea grasses and fresh water vegetation. But humans harm them with watercraft collisions and boat propellers that slice their skin. Mortality is so common that the state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has a phone line to report dead manatees.

Floridians call them sea cows, and they have marveled at them and swum with them at the popular Three Sisters Springs at the refuge in Citrus County for decades. In time, tourists from outside the state caught on.

Kayakers at Three Sisters Springs, near the town of Crystal River, watch a manatee swim by. (Andrea Sachs/The Washington Post)

Why allow all those people to swim with manatees and boat around them for just a few bucks? “The boardwalk at Three Sisters Springs … provides an unparalleled opportunity to view manatees in their natural habitat,” Dumais said.

It’s not like manatees are being harmed, said Charles Underwood, public information officer for Fish and Wildlife’s north Florida office, which is in charge of manatee recovery. When they are, even the smallest infraction is dealt with. “We do prosecute any harm to manatees,” he said. Like a group of kids who recently lured a manatees to them with cabbage “and did a cannonball on them. It’s a violation. It was a significant form of harassment.”

Read the original Washington Post article here

Season of luxe: Spring’s interior design trends include color, pattern, opulence

Animal prints, patterns and wood are part of the luxe trend in home furnishings, as seen here at the High Point Market.  Courtesy photo

Animal prints, patterns and wood are part of the luxe trend in home furnishings, as seen here at the High Point Market. Courtesy photo

One of the best ways to see what will be trending for furniture this season is to look at what was on display at the High Point Market in North Carolina. Last October’s show is a prognosticator of the best home furnishings and accessories that we’ll see this spring.

High Point’s “style spotters” took to social media to share their favorite looks, and the definitive High Point Market Style Report summed it all up.

Color and pattern

A pop of color is on trend as the economy perks up, said interior designer and style spotter Mitzi Beach. With designers adding assertive hues, consumers can make bolder color choices. We’ll be seeing a “dramatic color story of rich blood reds, mustard/saffron yellows and peacock teals,” said Studio M president Michelle Jennings Wiebe, style spotter emeritus. A little color goes a long way, so be calculated when adding color, Beach said.

Designers are combining metals, materials and finishes to create statement pieces, whether that means in a dining table or a chandelier. Think of a richly upholstered armchair with brushed copper chair legs. Details will shine in acrylic, copper, brass, lucite and mixed golden hues.

The excitement continues with an explosion of patterns.

“After years of beige, it was revitalizing to see vibrant colors and patterns recapturing the imagination of designers, said designer and style spotter Gary Inman. “Marbleized cottons, florals, stripes, Ikats, paisleys, fretwork and lattice, some painterly, others over-scaled for drama but all with a celebratory complexity. Animal prints, vintage textiles and architectural ornamentation also found their place as fabrics for upholstery and soft furnishings, as well as casegoods and even lighting.”

The sophisticated look of black and white makes a timeless and elegant statement in furnishings and accessories, said Inman. But the in color this spring is blue, ranging from indigo and navy to cobalt and robin’s egg.

Wildly popular in the 17th and 18th centuries, Chinoiserie (“in the Chinese taste”) is on trend this spring. On lacquered and painted furniture, wallpaper and decorative objects, chinoiserie features fanciful, idyllic scenes of elaborately robed figures and imaginary Chinese landscapes.

Feathers and birds have swooped into home furnishings.

“Cast in metal, printed on fabric, wallpaper, pillows, and even stuffed and mounted birds are showing up everywhere. Wings and feathers were also seen across the board — in casegoods, wall art, accessories and lighting,” said interior designer and style spotter Jeanne Chung.

Glamour and comfort

For wood finishes, natural wood is seeing a resurgence after years of being painted over in almost any color of the consumer’s choosing. This spring we’ll see “burl wood cabinets and beautiful faux-painted wood patterns, as well as inlay and interesting wood stain colors. These natural wood looks are an excellent way to ground a room full of painted finishes,” said interior designer and style spotter Denise McGaha.

Traditional furnishings are trending in a big way, but with a more modern spin, said interior designer and style spotter Meredith Heron. The feeling is opulence and luxury.

“Neoclassical motifs, reeded legs, carvings, French polish, hardware that can only be described as stunning jewelry and spectacular wood grains, such as flamed mahogany and rich Italian burl, are most certainly back. We are also seeing ferrules on chair and table legs — an additional layer of glamour that adds a touch of modern to the traditional,” she said.

Consumers are also embracing the merging of the outdoors and indoors with beautiful furnishings that offer comfort and durability.

“As outdoor fabrics take on a more luxurious feel, and indoor furnishings become places to work, eat, read and entertain, we are seeing durable outdoor materials move in as the comfort of indoor furniture steps outside,” Beach said.

Click here to read the original SeaCoastOnline article. 

Spring Refresh: Scent Styling Tips From Nate Berkus and Carlos Huber

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition: Charting A Course For Wildlife Preservation

Alternate Text

American Crocodile Everglades National Park, 2012 Expedition/Florida Wildlife Corridor

Submitted by Jameson Clifton on March 16, 2015

Trekking more than 1,000 miles through dense Florida jungles, coastal waterways, and tropical swamplands, the Florida Wildlife Corridor expedition team is charting a geographic path for wildlife migration and environmental preservation.

While Florida isn’t exactly the first place that comes to mind when exploring America’s untamed wilderness, you might be surprised to learn that Florida has not only one, but three national parks, as well as many other federally protected and incredibly bio-diverse areas. These include Everglades, Biscayne and Dry Tortugas national parks, each located in the southern-most region of the state, as well as Big Cypress National Preserve and theGulf Islands and Canaveral national seashores.

The FWC is a conservation organization striving to restore a natural connectivity between these lands by advocating the implementation of a protected, interconnected passageway. Specifically, the organization is “focused on connecting, protecting and restoring corridors of conserved lands and waters essential for the survival of Florida’s diverse wildlife. The organization showcases the need to protect the missing links in the Corridor, preserve Florida’s waters, and sustain working lands and rural economies from the Everglades to Georgia and Alabama.”

The first expedition launched in 2012 from the Everglades National Park, traveled north to central Florida, and finished in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia. Over a period of more than three months the team covered more than 1,000 miles through the heart of the state.

“Wild Florida is a little lesser known. We tend to live on the coast and look outwards. Everyone knows about Florida’s beaches, but not necessarily its interior. I think a common perception of Florida really is just Disneyworld and beaches, but there’s so much more to it! We’re trying showcase this everyday through our travels,” said FWC executive director and expedition member Mallory Dimmitt.

Through a series of education and awareness campaigns, the FWC team seeks to demonstrate the importance of preserving these fragile landscapes by highlighting the current and future environmental challenges; in the process, closing the disconnect between many Floridians and the wild side of their state.

Alternate Text

Florida Wildlife Corridor Executive Director Mallory Lykes Dimmitt in Everglades National Park at the beginning of the 2012 Expedition/Florida Wildlife Corridor

On January 10th, the team commenced its second expedition, this time heading northwest towards the Florida Panhandle. On March 2nd they completed the Apalachicola leg of the journey, highlighting one of the nation’s six biodiversity hotspots, known for fertile floodplains supporting more flora and fauna species than anywhere else in the United States and Canada.

This environment plays an integral role in the local economy, including the oyster industry, employing 2,500 people and generating more than $20 million in annual revenue according to the Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. Unfortunately, the future of the industry is facing fundamental threats like never before, including the loss of life-sustaining fresh water, loss of floodplain and wetland habitat, pollution and unrestrained human growth and development.

The next and final stop of the expedition is Gulf Islands National Seashore, where the team is scheduled to finish its expedition at Fort Pickens on Thursday. This protected coastline features offshore barrier islands known for sparkling white quartz beaches stretching along miles of undeveloped land. Unfortunately, the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, as well as previous destruction from the 2004-2005 hurricane season, greatly impacted the local infrastructure, economy, and fragile ecosystems.

“It took this oil spill to really make people ban together and work on protecting the declining environmental preservation of the Gulf,” said Mallory.

Alternate Text

Elam Stoltzfus, foreground, and Joe Guthrie explore Big Cypress National Preserve during the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition/Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition

To learn more, and support the FWC, visit: www.floridawildlifecorridor.org or www.facebook.com/FloridaWildlifeCorridor

Flagler Beach home tops sales at $530,000

Date: March 13, 2015
by: Shanna Fortier | Associate Editor

A Flagler Beach home tops the sales list for Flagler County residential real estate transactions the week of Jan. 30 to Feb. 4. James and Patricia Dezego, of Flagler Beach, sold the home at 557 N. 10th St. to Robert and Phyllis Cunningham, of Flagler Beach, for $530,000. Built in 2002, it has four bedrooms, three baths, a pool, a boat dock, house and lift and 3,006 square feet of living area.
BUNNELL

Plantation Reserve Estates
5 Hummingbird Circle LLC sold the home at 10 Deer Park Drive to Robert Lloyd Candler and Barbara Candler, of Bunnell, for $499,900. Built in 2014, it has four bedrooms two baths and 2,692 square feet of living area.
FLAGLER BEACH
James and Melinda Phillips, of Granbury, Texas, sold the home at 94 Palm Drive to Susan Coleman, of Palm Coast, for $205,000. Built in 1988, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,080 square feet of living area.
Morningside
Wayne Roadarmel, of Maple Shade, New Jersey, sold the home at 2308 Flagler Ave. S. to Allen Walker, of Woodland, Pennsylvania, for 4254,500. Built in 1977, it has three bedrooms, two baths, a boat dock and 1,452 square feet of living area.
PALM COAST
Belle Terre
Richard and Carin Mitchell, of Flagler Beach, sold the home at 62 Pebble Beach Drive to Ajay and Niti Wadhwa, of Bayside, New York, for $126,000. Built in 1985, it has three bedrooms, two baths, a pool, a fireplace and 1,685 square feet of living area.
Canopy Walk
William Mosley, personal representative of the estate of Susie Mosley Parker, sold the condo at 1200 Canopy Walk Lane, Unit 1222, to Lawrence Goodman and Liliane Trudell Goodman, of Canada, for $130,000. Built in 2004, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,377 square feet of living area.
Cypress Knoll
Steven Thomas and Bruce Garrison, trustees of the 174 Eric Drive Trust, sold the home at 174 Eric Drive to Nadia Grandus, of Luke Bluff, Illinois, for $235,000. Built in 1998, it has four bedrooms, two baths, a pool, a spa and 2,316 square feet of living area.
Grand Haven
Stephen and Jill Honeycomb, of Glastonbury, Connecticut, sold the home at 16 Hidden Lake Way to Michael and Amy Iezzi, of Palm Coast, for $348,000. Built in 2002, it has four bedrooms, two baths, a pool, a summer kitchen and 2,397 square feet of living area.
Tatiana Kirsheva sold the home at 5 Creekside Court to David Jaworski, of Palm Coast, for $347,500. Built in 2014, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 2,335 square feet of living area.
Indian Trails
Patricia Barton, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 20 Barrington Drive to Ron and Julia Malinin, of Richboro, Pennsylvania, for $100,000. Built in 2004, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 2,073 square feet of living area.
Robin Hockaday sold the home at 98 Beaverdam Lane to Patricia Baker, of Palm Coast, for $145,000. Built in 1987, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,872 square feet of living area.
Glenn Fairchild and Anthony Zaksewiez, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 43 Botany Lane to Eleanor Davison, of Palm Coast, for $117,000. Built in 1989, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,566 square feet of living area.
Ryan and Misty Arnold sold the home at 108 Braddock Lane to Kenneth Willett, of Palm Coast, for $109,900. Built in 1980, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,064 square feet of living area.
Bank of America sold the home at 87 Braddock Lane to Ilya M. Geller and Nataliya Geller, of Stuart, for $136,500. Built in 1995, it has three bedrooms, two baths, a pool and 2,101 square feet of living area.
Patricia Baylor, of Bunnell, sold the home at 19 Brian Lane to Daniel and Michelle Moser, of Palm Coast, for $167,500. Built in 2003, it has four bedrooms, two baths, a fireplace and 2,164 square feet of living area.
Lehigh Woods
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. sold the home at 29 Rosecroft Lane to Andy Martin-Arburua and Yipsi Martin-Arburua, of Palm Coast, for $120,000. Built in 2003, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,440 square feet of living area.
John and Virginia O’Hara, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 14 Royale Lane to Dawn Saffert, of Palm Coast, for $166,500. Built in 2005, it has two bedrooms, two baths and 1,650 square feet of living area.
Fannie Mae sold the home at 10 Rybar Lane to Antonio Vincenzo Dahm, of Dallas, Texas, for $127,000. Built in 2004, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,439 square feet of living area.
Matanzas Woods
Elio and Maria Tavares, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 27 Louisville Drive to Randolph Smiroldo, of Palm Coast, for $191,500. Built in 1998, it has three bedrooms, two baths, a pool, a spa and 2,209 square feet of living area.
Palm Coast Plantation
Katherine A. Toppi, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 99 Emerald Lake Drive to James Flammer and Judith Flammer, of Palm Coast, for $385,000. Built in 2009, it has four bedrooms, 2.5 baths and 2,554 square feet of living area.
Palm Harbor
James Edgar Frew Flammer and Judith Ann Flammer, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 20 Clearview Court N. to Ashley Sean Hatten and Jana Denise Hatten, of Palm Coast, for $249,000. Built in 1984, is has three bedrooms, two baths, a boat dock and 1,417 square feet of living area.
Joyce Wood, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 70 Courtney Place to Barbara Brooks, of Palm Coast, for $180,000. Built in 1981, it has four bedrooms, two baths and 2,455 square feet of living area.
Werner and Evelyn Heesch, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 46 Fenimore Lane to Anthony Pina, of San Juan Capistrano, California, for $225,000. Built in 1988, it has three bedrooms, two baths, a pool, a fireplace and 2,633 square feet of living area.
Loren L. Smith, Jason Wade and Shelena Wade, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 37 Florida Park Drive to Shirley Peavy, of Palm Coast, for $70,000. Built in 1975, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,912 square feet of living area.
Edwin and Edith Byrd, of Ormond Beach, sold the home at 26 Forest Grove Drive to Equity Trust Company Inc. for $98,000. Built in 2003, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,033 square feet of living area.
Fannie Mae sold the home at 78 Forest Hill Drive to Joseph J. Doskocil III and Joseph J. Doskcil Jr., of Palm Coast, for $140,000. Built in 2002, it has four bedrooms, two baths and 2,434 square feet of living area.
Pine Lakes
Ronald and Linda Jacoby, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 29 Wasserman Drive to Frank DeCarlo and JoAnne DeSpirito, of Ponte Vedra Beach, for $190,000. Built in 2004, it has three bedrooms, two baths, a pool and 1,623 square feet of living area.
Helen Eiduks, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 13 Waybourne Place to Francis Dymon, of Brooklyn, New York, for 160,000. Built in 2000, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,865 square feet of living area.
Barbara Bush, sold the home at 106 Wellington Drive to Timothy Lee Hunt and Sally Anne Hunt, of Bella Vista, Arizona, for $120,000. Built in 1988, it has three bedrooms, two baths, a spa and 1,687 square feet of living area.
Jack and Alma Dixon, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 269 Westhampton Drive to Frederick and Alexia McClendon, of Brooklyn, New York, for $210,000. Built in 1991, it has four bedrooms, two baths, a pool, a spa, a fireplace and 2,585 square feet of living area.
Bank of America sold the home at 4 White Deer Lane to Selene Finance LP for $110,000. Built in 1996, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,544 square feet of living area.
Frank and Linda Drogo, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 34 Whittingham Lane to Lloyd and Lyda Embree, of Palm Coast, for $250,000. Built in 2006, it has three bedrooms, 2.5 baths, a pool and 2,073 square feet of living area.
Fannie Mae sold the home at 12 Winchester Place to Loc and Bangphauong Phan, of Palm Coast, for $155,000. Built in 2002, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 2,029 square feet of living area.

Seminole Woods
Flagler County Holdings LLC sold the home at 33 Sea Front Trail to Patricia Perry, of Palm Coast, for $142,000. Built in 2007, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,621 square feet of living area.
Fannie Mae sold the home at 1 Seagrit Court to Deborah Reiber, of Palm Coast, for $102,000. Built in 2001, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,129 square feet of living area.
Kerry Jacobsen and Stephen Gabrilove, trustees of the 5 Sergeant Lane Trust to Tammie Cooley, of Palm Coast, for $195,000. Built in 2006, it has four bedrooms, three baths, a fireplace and 2,963 square feet of living area.
Gregory and Patricia O’Brien, of Palm Coast, sold the home at 48 Seven Wonders Trail to William Brumbaugh, of St. Augustine, for $186,000. Built in 2009, it has four bedrooms, two baths and 2,260 square feet of living area.
Bank of America sold the home at 49 Undershire Path to Allyson Nicole Harpster, of Palm Coast, for $125,000. Built in 2005, it has three bedrooms, three baths and 2,758 square feet of living area.
— Toby Tobin, of GoToby.com, contributed to this report.

– See more at: http://www.palmcoastobserver.com/news/palm-coast/News/0313201510313/Flagler-Beach-home-tops-sales-at-530000#sthash.jYxtFMUJ.dpuf

Color Commentary: What’s the Best Hue for Selling?

First impressions are key for buyers. Try these tips for selecting new color choices that'll help seal the deal, and get you to the closing table quickly.

By | March 12, 2015

You may love a bold hue, but a buyer may not. Find out what colors help sell homes.

Since Goethe published Theory of Colours back in the early 1800s, color theorists have expounded on the psychological impact that certain hues have on us. And with good reason: study after study proves that we equate color with emotion.

“Color evokes an emotional response in us all — whether we know it or not,” says Maria Killam, a color expert, decorator, and author of White is Complicated: A Decorators’ Guide to Choosing the Right White. “And the colors we choose for our homes are a public representation of how we see ourselves.”

This can become problematic, however, when you want to sell your home and not every potential buyer loves that teal trim as much as you do.

So what’s a seller to do — short of repainting every room beige?

Try these tips for selecting new color choices that will have you headed toward a closing date in no time.

Start outside

While interiors are important, the exterior is the first thing buyers will see (especially if they’re just driving by your home).

“Be sure your front door, mailbox post, porch, or deck are freshly painted or stained — if the outside of your house looks weather-beaten or if there’s any sign of mold growing on the clapboards, paint the exterior too,” says Bessie Zevgaras, a broker sales associate for Coldwell Banker in Fort Lee, NJ.

When choosing an exterior hue, use your neighborhood as your guide. If you live among a sea of gray and taupe facades, red probably isn’t your best bet.

While it’s tempting to want to choose a color that will make your home stand out from the pack, it’s also important to consider how it will measure up against nearby properties.

Make it monochromatic

Stick to a single all-over neutral in your main rooms, but it’s OK to expand beyond cream or taupe.

Try a warm gray like Sherwin-Williams 7029 “Agreeable Grey” or, if you have a lot of earth tones in your décor, Sherwin-Williams 6148 “Wool Skein,” says Killam.

“It’s easier for buyers to visualize their furniture in your house if they are not influenced by a lot of busy, dark colors.”

Plus, light, neutral colors “look smashing in online photographs, which is the first place people check when searching for homes,” adds Zevgaras.

Rely on white in the kitchen

“White cabinets are the best and most timeless color for kitchens,” says Killam. “It’s much harder to know when a kitchen was installed if it’s white, which is great for resale.”

Unsure which blanc to buy? Go for a classic: Benjamin Moore OC-117 “Simply White” is an excellent choice.

Paint your bedroom blue

“There’s something calming and relaxing about blue bedrooms, and they look great with white bedding if you don’t want to commit to a new duvet cover,” says Killam.

If you’re ready to take the plunge, two winning shades are Sherwin-Williams 6204 “Sea Salt” or 6232 “Misty.”

Keep your bathrooms bright

If they’re white or cream, leave them, but if the bathrooms in your home are already a fun color, there’s no need to repaint — this is the one place that people expect (and forgive) a little personality.

Just be sure to avoid the contrast wall (painting one wall a dark color) in any room, advises Killam, which can make a space feel small.

– See more at: http://www.trulia.com/blog/what-colors-sell-homes/#sthash.m4mDpOSz.dpuf